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3D Print - Arxiv

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Last Updated: 10 June 2022

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Topologically engineered 3D printed architectures with superior mechanical strength

"Lightweight materials enable energy conservation and minimize the amount of resources needed for manufacturing," says the author. Architecturally designed materials, which take advantage of new engineering paradigms, have recently emerged as an exciting way to produce customized combinations of desired macroscopic material responses. Using computer aided design models, advanced additive manufacturing has enabled the rapid manufacture of complex geometrical and bio-inspired architectures. We give a viewpoint on topologically engineered architectured materials that have excellent mechanical properties and can be quickly printed using additive manufacturing in this essay.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2206.00418v1


More Stiffness with Less Fiber: End-to-End Fiber Path Optimization for 3D-Printed Composites

"Through tight fabrics in 3D printing can strengthen thermoplastic polymers with limited stiffness. " Nevertheless, existing industrial digital manufacturing software only supports a few basic fiber layout schemes, which solely use the shape's geometry. In this work, we develop an automated fiber path planning algorithm that increases the stiffness of a 3D printer given specific external loads. We use finite element analysis to determine the strain field on the object and then eagerly "walk" in the direction of the stress field to begin to recognize each fiber path. Our algorithms result in increased stiffness among objects with fiber paths created by our algorithm, which use less fabric than our baselines-our algorithm increases the Pareto frontier of object stiffness as a result of fiber usage. ".

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.16008v1


Geometries and fabrication methods for 3D printing ion traps

"The bulk of microfabricated ion traps used for quantum information processing are of the 2D'surface-electrode' variety or of the 3D 'wafer' style. " Conversely, 3D geometries provide superior trap results, but manufacturing is more difficult, restricting ability to scale. Since all the integration methods and scaling benefits of surface-electrode traps have been preserved, we suggest that such traps be 3D-printed over a 2D wafer with microfabricated parts already integrated into it. We use two-photon direct laser writing lithography to print the required electrode structures with the desired geometry as a proof of principle.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.15892v1


3D printed acoustically programmable soft microactuators

"The concept of manufacturing all-mechanical soft microrobotic systems has a huge potential to solve outstanding challenges in biomedical research and the development of more cost-effective and multifunctional products. " With the introduction of selectively excited air bubbles and compactly designed compliant mechanisms, we can see that programmed commands can be contained on 3D nanoprinted polymer systems. A variety of micromechanical systems are engineered using experimentally verified computational methods that investigate the effects of primary and secondary pressure fields on entrapped air bubbles and the surrounding fluid. The behavior of bubble oscillators in Coupling's fluid oscillators reveals a variety of acoustofluidic interactions that can be controlled in space and time.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.12625v1


Photoelastic Stress Response of Complex 3D-Printed Particle Shapes

Traditional photoelastic techniques suffer from a lack of suitable complex particles, which can be greatly enhanced our understanding of 3-dimensional particles' behavior. " Stress visualization within 3-dimensional particles would greatly improve our knowledge of complex particle behavior. 3D-printing has opened new opportunities for expanding the scope of stress investigation within physically representative granules. We present the results of X-ray computed tomography and 3D printing, as well as traditional photoelastic analysis, to visualize strain for particles ranging from simple 2D discs to intricate 3D printed coffee beans, including internal voids.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07622v1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions