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1918 Influenza Pandemic - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 16 April 2022

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Death Patterns during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in Chile

Pandemic trends in South America and elsewhere are difficult to grasp across the continent and within many climatic zones, with scarce facts about historical influenza pandemics in South America. Several pandemic waves of various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred between 1918-1921 and 1919, with influenza-related excess deaths at their peak during July-August 1919. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic in Chile was expected at 0. 9 percent, similar to rates in Latin America, but provinces varied by tenfold.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2011.130632


Pathogenic Responses among Young Adults during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

The highest mortality rate among young adults is the most notable among the unexplained characteristics of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic. People who were exposed to influenza in 1918 and 1918 were likely to have dysregulated, pathologic immune responses to infections with the A/H1N1 1918 pandemic strain, according to historical findings and results from laboratory animal studies. However, T-cell-mediated immunopathologic responses should be closely monitored when creating and using universal influenza vaccines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1802.102042


Race and 1918 Influenza Pandemic in the United States: A Review of the Literature

The black population had lower morbidity in September, October, and November, and November, showed lower mortality among the white population but higher case fatality than the white population. The results also show that the black population had lower influenza morbidity before 1918. Black people had a reduced risk of getting the disease as a result of exposure, according to studies, but if they did get sick, they were at a higher risk of dying.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142487


Age-specific mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic: unravelling the mystery of high young adult mortality.

Even for people in the prime of life, the worldwide distribution of a novel influenza A virus showed that influenza remains a significant health risk, even among those in the early stages of life. We speculate that in specific instances, immunological memory building in an influenza virus strain early in life may lead to a dysregulated immune response to antigenically novel strains encountered in later life, thus raising the risk of death. During future influenza pandemics, knowing of the age-pattern of susceptibility to influenza may aid in crisis planning.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069586


Back to the Future: Lessons Learned From the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

Some people survived the 1918 pandemic and others died as a result of the virus. Unresolved questions about why the 1918 influenza H1N1 virus was more virulent than other influenza pandemics and why some people survived the 1918 pandemic and some succumbed to it were unsolved. Co-infections with bacterial pathogens, as well as measles and malaria, co-morbidities, malnutrition, or obesity have all been shown to influence influenza disease severity and outcomes in 1918, which has possibly influenced 1918 H1N1 disease severity and results. In addition, we also address the emerging challenges, such as population demographics, antibiotic resistance, and climate change, which will all be facing in the context of a potential influenza virus pandemic. In the last decade, a dramatic rise in the number of severe influenza virus strains entering the human race from animal reservoirs has been on the rise. An investigation into past influenza virus pandemics and the lessons we have learned from them has therefore never been more relevant.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2018.00343


Tuberculosis as a Risk Factor for 1918 Influenza Pandemic Outcomes

Tuberculosis mortality dropped after the 1918 pandemic, implying that influenza killed those who would have died of TB. TB has been shown as a direct risk factor for 1918 influenza morbidity and mortality by age and sex in several studies. Patients and employees from two Norwegian sanatoriums are compared by case-control comparisons to determine the effects of TB on influenza-like illness and case fatality by age and sex. Both sanatoriums combined determined that the case-control difference in case fatality by sex was only relevant for females at Lyster sanatorium and females at both sanatoriums combined. Both sexes combined at Lyster sanatorium and females 2029 years for both sanatoriums and females 2029 years for both sanatoriums, as well as females 2029 years for both sanatoriums combined, had significant incidence fatality in both sanatoriums and females 2029 years for both sanatoriums combined, with both sanatoriums having a dramatic rise in case fatality. We conclude that TB was associated with increased case fatality in patients, but physicians' morbidity was lower than for employees.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020074


Impact of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in Coastal Kenya

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the first pandemic recorded in human history. We used colonial-era records to explain the effects of the 1918 influenza pandemic in Kenya's Coast Province. We found that crude mortality rates and healthcare use increased six-fold and three-fold, respectively, in 1918, with a pandemic mortality rate of 25. 3 deaths/1000 people per year. Letters revealed that the impact to society and the health care system was strong. Preparation for the next pandemic outbreaks requires continued improvement in surveillance, education about influenza vaccines, and efforts to prevent, identify, and respond to novel influenza outbreaks.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020091


The 1918 influenza pandemic and subsequent birth deficit in Japan

Conclusions : This study found a negative and statistically significant correlation between deaths at time t+9 and births at time t+9 rdb=1. 097. 397. p. 397,p Conclusions: The results of this paper showed that a combination of reduced conceptions and embryonic losses during the first month of pregnancy was the primary link between pandemic-associated mortality and future births, according to earlier studies that indicated that late first-trimester embryonic death at t-related pandet t a t t+9 t t+9 t t+9 t t+9 t and a t-related to t-prema t-related to later in t-related t and subsequent depressed fertility t+9 t and t+9 t and t +9 t+9.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2015.33.11


Host immunological factors enhancing mortality of young adults during the 1918 influenza pandemic

During the 1918 influenza pandemic, healthy young adults became increasingly susceptible and were considered more vulnerable than young children and the elderly. Each of these responses may have contributed to their overall susceptibility by the introduction of the H1N1 pandemic virus to a na've immune system, the virulence of the virus, and dysfunctional host inflammatory and immunologic responses influenced by previous influenza infections.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2015.00419


Effects of reactive social distancing on the 1918 influenza pandemic.

Multiple epidemic waves characterized the 1918 influenza pandemic in 1918. Human responses were modelled by a Power function of the proportion of recent influenza deaths in a population and a Hill function, which is a result of the number of recent influenza deaths in a population. We developed a good model fit for the observed multiple epidemic waves in London boroughs, Birmingham, and Liverpool using a simple epidemic model with a Power function and a common set of parameters. We modified the model parameters from these three cities to all 334 administrative units in England and Wales, as well as the population sizes of individual administrative units. Pearson's correlation between the observed and simulate for each administrative unit was determined by We calculated Pearson's correlation between the observed and simulated for each administrative unit. During an influenza pandemic, We also demonstrated the importance of reactive behavioral distancing as a potential non-pharmaceutical intervention.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180545

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions